Section Probate Litigation


The Trust and Estate Litigation Section covers and supplements substantive and procedural law governing contested 17200 Petitions, Petition for Removal, Contests, 850 petitions, Objections to Petitions for (any requested relief or orders) requiring an evidentiary hearing, any contested matter subject to a settlement conference, any trust and estate matter that may go to mediation or another form of ADR, Elder Abuse both physical and financial and other matters affecting disputes over the distribution of trusts and estates. The section offers Continuing Legal Education (CLE) and works closely with the bench to improve the administration of justice in the Probate Court.

Section Chair

Timothy Barteau
415 453 9433
tbarteau@rflawllp.com

Notice
Main County Superior Court

Uniform Local Rules 2

Updated July 1, 2019
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There are no upcoming Probate Litigation events

Resources Navigating Your Practice During COVID-19
Apr 01, 2020
By MCBA

MCBA is working to deliver information and essential resources to our membership to navigate their practices during COVID-19 crisis. Our neighboring Bar Association of San Francisco (BASF) shared a program to assist small and solo practices.

ALERT from Marin Courts
Mar 16, 2020
By MCBA

As of April 1, 2020. Presiding Judge Andrew Sweet signed a new administrative order closing Marin Superior Courts for non-essential matters till June 1. Link to court order

Dec 01, 2019
By The Marin Lawyer

MCBA thanks the 2019 section chairpersons and highlights some of the CLE programs.

Jun 05, 2019

The Probate Examiner for the Marin Superior Court, Dean Ross, will be retiring as of June 28. The court is actively pursuing a replacement but it will be a few months before that position is filled and the new employee is current with the position. This will likely impact the probate department and there will likely be many continuance requests made by the court during the months of July/August.

Apr 30, 2019
By Cynthia McGuinn and Daniel B. Pleasant

What do Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, and Arthur Miller’s The Crucible have in common? Each playwright used dramatic forms to explore questions of justice, setting the action of each play in a courtroom setting where that theme can be explored.